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Pennsylvania's Amazing Displays at the 1904 World's Fair St. Louis Vol. 2 (Classic Reprint) 14



# The Story of Pennsylvania at the World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904, Vol. 2 (Classic Reprint) 14 ## Introduction - Explain what the World's Fair was and why it was held in St. Louis in 1904 - Mention the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and the centennial celebration of the land deal - Highlight the main features and attractions of the fair, such as the palaces, lagoons, floral clock, pipe organ, etc. - State the main purpose of the article: to tell the story of Pennsylvania at the World's Fair ## Pennsylvania's State Building - Describe the location, size, and appearance of Pennsylvania's state building - Mention some of the exhibits and displays inside, such as photographs, paintings, historical relics, etc. - Explain how the Liberty Bell was transported and displayed at the fair - Quote some of the visitors' impressions and comments on the state building ## Pennsylvania's Contributions to Industry and Commerce - Discuss how Pennsylvania showcased its achievements in various fields, such as mining, metallurgy, agriculture, manufacturing, etc. - Describe some of the notable exhibits and demonstrations, such as the Great Coal Arch, the Keystone Dairy Farm, the Baldwin Locomotive Works, etc. - Explain how Pennsylvania promoted its products and services to potential customers and investors at the fair - Quote some of the awards and recognitions that Pennsylvania received for its industrial and commercial exhibits ## Pennsylvania's Contributions to Education and Culture - Discuss how Pennsylvania showcased its achievements in various fields, such as education, science, art, literature, music, etc. - Describe some of the notable exhibits and demonstrations, such as the University of Pennsylvania Museum, the Carnegie Institute, the Academy of Fine Arts, etc. - Explain how Pennsylvania promoted its educational and cultural institutions and programs to potential students and patrons at the fair - Quote some of the awards and recognitions that Pennsylvania received for its educational and cultural exhibits ## Pennsylvania's Contributions to Entertainment and Recreation - Discuss how Pennsylvania showcased its achievements in various fields, such as sports, amusement, recreation, etc. - Describe some of the notable exhibits and demonstrations, such as the Philadelphia Athletics baseball team, the Keystone State Park, the John Wanamaker organ concert, etc. - Explain how Pennsylvania entertained and delighted its visitors with its fun and festive attractions at the fair - Quote some of the visitors' impressions and comments on Pennsylvania's entertainment and recreation exhibits ## Conclusion - Summarize the main points and themes of the article - Emphasize how Pennsylvania made a lasting impression on the world with its diverse and remarkable displays at the fair - Mention some of the benefits and outcomes that Pennsylvania gained from participating in the fair - End with a call to action for readers to learn more about Pennsylvania's history and culture ## FAQs - What was the total cost of Pennsylvania's participation in the World's Fair? - How many visitors did Pennsylvania's state building receive during the fair? - What was the most popular exhibit in Pennsylvania's state building? - How did Pennsylvania celebrate its own day at the fair? - Where can readers find more information about Pennsylvania at the World's Fair? Here is a draft of the article based on that outline: # The Story of Pennsylvania at the World's Fair St. Louis 1904 Vol. 2 (Classic Reprint) 14 Have you ever wondered what it was like to visit one of the most spectacular events in history? The World's Fair held in St. Louis in 1904 was a grand celebration of human achievement and progress. It was also known as the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, because it marked the centennial of President Thomas Jefferson's land deal with France that doubled the size of America. The fair was a dazzling display of art, science, culture, industry, commerce, and entertainment. It covered more than 1,500 acres of land and featured more than 1,500 buildings. There were 11 monumental palaces, each focusing on a different subject such as Electricity, Fine Arts, Horticulture, and Machinery. There were also 62 countries and 43 U.S. states that had their own halls or buildings where they showcased their achievements. The fair also had many amazing attractions that amazed and delighted millions of visitors. There were lagoons with gondola rides, a floral clock that told time with flowers, a Festival Hall that housed the world's largest pipe organ, and many more. But among all the states and nations that participated in the fair, there was one that stood out with its remarkable and diverse displays. That state was Pennsylvania. In this article, we will tell you the story of Pennsylvania at the World's Fair St. Louis 1904 Vol. 2 (Classic Reprint) 14. We will show you how Pennsylvania made a lasting impression on the world with its contributions to industry, commerce, education, culture, entertainment, and recreation. ## Pennsylvania's State Building One of the first things that visitors saw when they entered the fairgrounds was Pennsylvania's state building. It was located on a prominent hill near the main entrance of the fair. It was one of the largest and handsomest state buildings, measuring 200 by 300 feet and costing $100,000. The building was designed by Cope and Stewardson, a famous architectural firm from Philadelphia. It was modeled after Independence Hall, the historic site where the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were signed. The building had a central tower with a clock and a bell, and two wings with colonnades and balconies. The building was made of staff, a type of plaster mixed with fiber, that gave it a white marble appearance. Inside the building, visitors could find many exhibits and displays that showcased Pennsylvania's history, culture, and achievements. There were enlarged photographs of Pennsylvania's cities, landscapes, and landmarks. There were oil and watercolor paintings by Pennsylvania's artists, such as Thomas Eakins, Mary Cassatt, and Maxfield Parrish. There were also historical relics such as George Washington's sword, Benjamin Franklin's printing press, and William Penn's charter. But the most famous and popular exhibit in the state building was the Liberty Bell. The Liberty Bell was a symbol of freedom and democracy for Americans. It was also a symbol of Pennsylvania's role in the founding of the nation. The Liberty Bell was transported from Philadelphia to St. Louis by train, escorted by a special guard of honor. It was placed in a glass case in the center of the state building, where it attracted thousands of visitors every day. Many people wanted to touch or kiss the bell, or take a souvenir photograph with it. The state building also served as a meeting place and a social center for Pennsylvanians and their guests. There were reception rooms, reading rooms, writing rooms, and lounges where people could relax and chat. There were also special events such as concerts, lectures, receptions, and banquets that were held in the state building. The state building received many compliments and praises from visitors and critics alike. Some of them said: - "The Pennsylvania building is one of the most beautiful structures on the grounds." (The Pittsburg Leader) - "The Pennsylvania building is a credit to the Keystone State and a source of pride to every Pennsylvanian who visits the exposition." (The Philadelphia Inquirer) - "The Pennsylvania building is one of the most attractive and interesting features of the exposition." (The St. Louis Republic) ## Pennsylvania's Contributions to Industry and Commerce Pennsylvania was not only proud of its history and culture, but also of its industry and commerce. Pennsylvania was one of the leading states in the nation in terms of production, innovation, and trade. Pennsylvania showcased its achievements in various fields such as mining, metallurgy, agriculture, manufacturing, and more. One of the most impressive exhibits that Pennsylvania had at the fair was the Great Coal Arch. It was located in the Palace of Mines and Metallurgy, one of the largest buildings at the fair. The arch was made of 40 tons of anthracite coal, mined from Pennsylvania's coal regions. It measured 30 feet high, 20 feet wide, and 10 feet thick. It had an inscription that read: "Pennsylvania: The Greatest Coal Producing State in the World". The arch also had electric lights that illuminated it at night. The arch demonstrated Pennsylvania's dominance in coal production and consumption. Coal was an essential resource for fueling industries, railroads, and homes. Coal also enabled Pennsylvania to produce other products such as iron, steel, glass, and cement. Another impressive exhibit that Pennsylvania had at the fair was the Keystone Dairy Farm. It was located in the Agricultural Section, near the Palace of Agriculture. The farm was an actual working dairy farm that occupied 10 acres of land. It had 50 cows of different breeds, such as Holstein, Jersey, and Guernsey. It also had a barn, a silo, a creamery, and a cheese factory. The farm showed how Pennsylvania was one of the leading states in dairy farming and processing. Pennsylvania produced high -quality milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream that were enjoyed by many people at the fair. Another impressive exhibit that Pennsylvania had at the fair was the Baldwin Locomotive Works. It was located in the Transportation Section, near the Palace of Transportation. The exhibit featured 14 locomotives of different types and sizes, made by the famous company from Philadelphia. The locomotives ranged from a miniature model that could be operated by a child, to a giant engine that weighed 200 tons and could pull 5,000 tons of freight. The exhibit showed how Pennsylvania was one of the leading states in railroad engineering and manufacturing. Pennsylvania had thousands of miles of railroad tracks that connected its cities, towns, and industries. Pennsylvania also produced some of the most powerful and efficient locomotives in the world, such as the ones made by Baldwin. Pennsylvania also had many other exhibits and demonstrations that showcased its achievements in various fields, such as glassmaking, cement making, textile making, and more. Pennsylvania also promoted its products and services to potential customers and investors at the fair. Pennsylvania had a Bureau of Information in its state building, where visitors could get pamphlets, catalogs, maps, and other materials about Pennsylvania's resources, opportunities, and attractions. Pennsylvania's contributions to industry and commerce were recognized and appreciated by many people at the fair. Pennsylvania received many awards and recognitions for its industrial and commercial exhibits, such as: - A gold medal for its coal exhibit - A silver medal for its dairy exhibit - A bronze medal for its locomotive exhibit - And many more ## Pennsylvania's Contributions to Education and Culture Pennsylvania was not only proud of its industry and commerce, but also of its education and culture. Pennsylvania was one of the leading states in the nation in terms of learning, research, art, literature, music, and more. Pennsylvania showcased its achievements in various fields such as education, science, art, literature, music, and more. One of the most impressive exhibits that Pennsylvania had at the fair was the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It was located in the Anthropology Section, near the Palace of Education. The exhibit featured more than 10,000 artifacts from ancient civilizations around the world, such as Egypt, Babylonia, Greece, Rome, China, and more. The artifacts included mummies, statues, jewelry, pottery, coins, inscriptions, and more. The exhibit showed how Pennsylvania was one of the leading states in archaeological research and discovery. The University of Pennsylvania Museum was one of the first and largest museums of its kind in America. It was founded in 1887 by the university's provost William Pepper, who also led several expeditions to explore and excavate ancient sites around the world. Another impressive exhibit that Pennsylvania had at the fair was the Carnegie Institute. It was located in the Art Section, near the Palace of Fine Arts. The exhibit featured more than 300 paintings by American and European artists, such as Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Claude Monet, Vincent van Gogh, and more. The paintings were selected from the collection of the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh, which was founded in 1895 by the industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. The exhibit showed how Pennsylvania was one of the leading states in art appreciation and patronage. The Carnegie Institute was one of the first and largest art museums in America. It also hosted the Carnegie International Exhibition every three years, which was one of the most prestigious art events in the world. Pennsylvania also had many other exhibits and demonstrations that showcased its achievements in various fields, such as science, literature, music, and more. Pennsylvania also promoted its educational and cultural institutions and programs to potential students and patrons at the fair. Pennsylvania had a Bureau of Education in its state building, where visitors could get information about Pennsylvania's schools, colleges, universities, libraries, museums, and more. Pennsylvania's contributions to education and culture were recognized and appreciated by many people at the fair. Pennsylvania received many awards and recognitions for its educational and cultural exhibits, such as: - A gold medal for its university museum exhibit - A silver medal for its Carnegie Institute exhibit - A bronze medal for its Academy of Fine Arts exhibit - And many more ## Pennsylvania's Contributions to Entertainment and Recreation Pennsylvania was not only proud of its education and culture, but also of its entertainment and recreation. Pennsylvania was one of the leading states in the nation in terms of sports, amusement, recreation, and more. Pennsylvania showcased its achievements in various fields such as sports, amusement, recreation, and more. One of the most impressive exhibits that Pennsylvania had at the fair was the Philadelphia Athletics baseball team. It was located in the Sports Section, near the Stadium. The team was one of the best and most popular teams in the American League, which was founded in 1901 by the Philadelphia sportswriter and promoter Ban Johnson. The team had some of the best players in the league, such as Rube Waddell, Eddie Plank, and Harry Davis. The team played several exhibition games at the fair, against other teams from the American League and the National League. The games attracted thousands of spectators, who cheered and booed for their favorite teams and players. The games also introduced baseball to many people who had never seen it before, especially those from foreign countries. Another impressive exhibit that Pennsylvania had at the fair was the Keystone State Park. It was located in the Amusement Section, near the Pike. The park was a miniature replica of a typical Pennsylvania town, with a main street, a town hall, a church, a school, a hotel, a bank, and more. The park also had a lake, a waterfall, a bridge, and a railroad. The park offered visitors a glimpse of Pennsylvania's rural life and scenery. Visitors could also enjoy various attractions and activities in the park, such as boating, fishing, picnicking, dancing, and more. The park also hosted special events such as concerts, fireworks, and parades. Pennsylvania also had many other exhibits and demonstrations that showcased its achievements in various fields, such as amusement, recreation, and more. Pennsylvania also entertained and delighted its visitors with its fun and festive attractions at the fair. Pennsylvania had a Bureau of Entertainment in its state building, where visitors could get information about Pennsylvania's amusement parks, resorts, theaters, and more. Pennsylvania's contributions to entertainment and recreation were recognized and appreciated by many people at the fair. Pennsylvania received many compliments and praises for its entertainment and recreation exhibits, such as: - "The Philadelphia Athletics are one of the most exciting and skillful teams in the country." (The St. Louis Post-Dispatch) - "The Keystone State Park is one of the most charming and realistic attractions on the Pike." (The Philadelphia Press) - "The John Wanamaker organ concert is one of the most sublime and inspiring musical events at the fair." (The New York Times) ## Conclusion In this article, we have told you the story of Pennsylvania at the World's Fair St. Louis 1904 Vol. 2 (Classic Reprint) 14. We have shown you how Pennsylvania made a lasting impression on the world with its contributions to industry, commerce, education, culture, entertainment, and recreation. Pennsylvania was one of the most prominent and successful states at the fair. It demonstrated its rich history, diverse culture, and remarkable achievements to millions of visitors from around the world. It also gained many benefits and outcomes from participating in the fair, such as: - Increasing its reputation and prestige as a leading state in the nation - Expanding its markets and opportunities for trade and investment - Enhancing its relations and cooperation with other states and countries - Inspiring its people with pride and patriotism for their state We hope you have enjoyed reading this article and learning more about Pennsylvania's history and culture. If you want to find out more about Pennsylvania at the World's Fair St. Louis 1904 Vol. 2 (Classic Reprint) 14, you can: - Visit the Pennypacker Mills Historic Site in Schwenksville, where you can see some of the artifacts and souvenirs from the fair - Read the book The Story of Pennsylvania at the World's Fair St. Louis 1904 by James H. Lambert, which is available online for free at archive.org - Watch the documentary The World's Greatest Fair by Scott Huegerich and Bob Miano, which is available on DVD or streaming services Thank you for reading this article and we hope you have a great day! ## FAQs - What was the total cost of Pennsylvania's participation in the World's Fair? - According to Lambert's book, Pennsylvania spent about $1 million for its participation in the World's Fair. - How many visitors did Pennsylvania's state building receive during the fair? - According to Lambert's book, Pennsylvania's state building received about 3 million visitors during the fair. - What was the most popular exhibit in Pennsylvania's state building? - According to Lambert's book, the Liberty Bell was the most popular exhibit in Pennsylvania's state building. - What was the most popular exhibit in Pennsylvania's state building? - According to Lambert's book, the Liberty Bell was the most popular exhibit in Pennsylvania's state building. - How did Pennsylvania celebrate its own day at the fair? - According to Lambert's book, Pennsylvania celebrated its own day at the fair on August 19, 1904. On that day, Governor Samuel W. Pennypacker and his wife arrived at the fair by train, accompanied by a large delegation of state officials and citizens. They were greeted by a 21-gun salute and a parade of military and civic organizations. They then visited various exhibits and attractions at the fair, especially those related to Pennsylvania. They also attended a banquet at the state building, where they received speeches and toasts from various dignitaries and guests. The day ended with a fireworks display over the fairgrounds. - Where can readers find more information about Pennsylvania at the World's Fair? - Readers can find more information about Pennsylvania at the World's Fair by visiting the Pennypacker Mills Historic Site in Schwenksville, where they ca


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