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The CAGED System and 100 Licks for Blues Guitar: Unlock Your Creativity and Express Yourself on Guitar


The CAGED System and 100 Licks for Blues Guitar: Learn To Play The Blues Your Way! downloads 14




If you love playing blues guitar, you might have heard of the CAGED system and blues licks. These are two powerful tools that can help you improve your skills, expand your vocabulary, and express yourself better on the instrument. But what are they exactly, and how can you use them effectively?




The CAGED System and 100 Licks for Blues Guitar: Learn To Play The Blues Your Way! downloads 14


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In this article, you will learn everything you need to know about the CAGED system and 100 licks for blues guitar. You will discover what they are, how they work, and how you can apply them to your own playing. You will also get access to a free download of 14 blues licks that you can use right away.


By the end of this article, you will be able to play the blues your way, with more confidence, creativity, and fun. So grab your guitar and let's get started!


What is the CAGED system?




The CAGED system is a method of organizing the fretboard based on five basic chord shapes: C, A, G, E, and D. These shapes are derived from the open chords that most beginners learn first. By moving these shapes up and down the neck, you can create any chord you want.


The five basic chord shapes




Here are the five basic chord shapes that form the basis of the CAGED system:



Shape


Chord


Fret


C


C major


Open


A


A major


Open


G


G major


Open


E


E major


Open


D


D major


Open


You can play these shapes anywhere on the fretboard by using a barre or a capo. For example, if you move the C shape up two frets, you get a D major chord. If you move the A shape up three frets, you get a C major chord. And so on.


How to apply the CAGED system to the fretboard




The CAGED system allows you to see how these shapes are connected across the fretboard. For any given chord, there is a corresponding shape from the CAGED system that fits it. For example, if you want to play a C major chord, you can use any of the five shapes:



  • The C shape at the open position



  • The A shape at the third fret



  • The G shape at the fifth fret



  • The E shape at the eighth fret



  • The D shape at the tenth fret



These shapes form a pattern that repeats itself every 12 frets. You can visualize this pattern by using the root notes of the chord as reference points. The root note is the note that gives the chord its name. For example, in a C major chord, the root note is C.


Here is how the CAGED system looks like for a C major chord:



e-------------------------------------------------------------------- B-------------------------------------------------------------------- G----------------------0---2---4----5---7---9---10---12-------------- D-----0---2---3----5------------------------------------------------- A-3------------------------------------------------------------------ E-------------------------------------------------------------------- C A G E D C A G E D C


You can use the same pattern for any other chord, by simply shifting it to match the root note. For example, if you want to play a G major chord, you can use the same shapes, but start from the third fret:



e-------------------------------------------------------------------- B-----0---1---3----5---7---8---10---12------------------------------- G-0-------------------------------------0---2---4----5---7---9---10-- D----------------------0---2---3----5-------------------------------- A------------------3---------------------------------3--------------- E-3---------------------------------3-------------------------------- G E D C A G E D C A G


The benefits of using the CAGED system




The CAGED system has many benefits for guitar players of all levels. Here are some of them:



  • It helps you learn the fretboard and find any chord quickly and easily.



  • It helps you play chords in different voicings and inversions, which can add variety and interest to your rhythm playing.



  • It helps you play chords with extensions and alterations, which can add color and tension to your harmony.



  • It helps you play arpeggios and scales over chords, which can improve your lead playing and soloing.



  • It helps you understand music theory and chord progressions, which can enhance your musical knowledge and creativity.



What are blues licks?




Blues licks are short musical phrases that are used to play blues guitar. They are usually based on the blues scale, which is a pentatonic scale with an added flat fifth note. The blues scale can be played in any key, but the most common ones are A, E, G, and C.


The definition and characteristics of blues licks




A blues lick is a combination of notes that sounds good over a blues chord or progression. It can be as simple as a single note or as complex as a series of bends, slides, hammer-ons, pull-offs, vibratos, and other techniques. A blues lick can be played in any position on the fretboard, but it usually follows the shape of the blues scale.


A blues lick has some distinctive characteristics that make it sound bluesy. Here are some of them:



  • It uses the flat fifth note (also called the blue note) to create dissonance and tension.



  • It uses bends to imitate the vocal style of blues singers and to add expression and emotion.



  • It uses repetition to create rhythm and groove.



  • It uses call and response to create contrast and dialogue.



  • It uses dynamics to create variation and interest.



How to play blues licks in different keys and positions




How to combine blues licks with chords and scales




To combine blues licks with chords and scales, you need to know how to match them to the underlying harmony. The simplest way to do this is to use the same key and position for both the chords and the licks. For example, if you are playing a blues progression in A, you can use the A blues scale and the A chord shape from the CAGED system to play both the rhythm and the lead parts.


However, you can also spice up your playing by using different keys and positions for the chords and the licks. For example, you can use the E shape from the CAGED system to play an A chord at the fifth fret, and then use the G shape to play an A blues scale at the tenth fret. This way, you can create more contrast and movement between the chords and the licks.


Another way to combine blues licks with chords and scales is to use different modes and tonalities. For example, you can use the Mixolydian mode to play over dominant seventh chords, which are very common in blues. The Mixolydian mode is a major scale with a flat seventh note. It can add more color and flavor to your blues playing. You can also use the Dorian mode to play over minor seventh chords, which are also used in blues. The Dorian mode is a minor scale with a raised sixth note. It can add more depth and emotion to your blues playing.


How to learn 100 licks for blues guitar?




To learn 100 licks for blues guitar, you need to have a good source of inspiration, a good method of practice, and a good way of application. Here are some tips and tricks for each of these aspects.


The sources and examples of blues licks




The best source of inspiration for blues licks is listening to blues music. You can learn a lot from listening to the masters of blues guitar, such as B.B. King, Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, Albert King, Freddie King, Buddy Guy, Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, and many others. You can also listen to other genres of music that use blues licks, such as rock, jazz, country, funk, soul, and pop.


You can also find many examples of blues licks in books, magazines, websites, videos, courses, and apps. There are many resources available online that can teach you how to play blues licks in different styles, keys, positions, and levels of difficulty. You can also download a free PDF of 14 blues licks that you can use right away.


The tips and tricks for learning blues licks




The practice routines and exercises for mastering blues licks




The best way of application for mastering blues licks is using them in real musical situations. You should practice playing blues licks over different chord progressions, songs, styles, and genres. You should also practice playing blues licks in different keys, positions, and octaves. You should also practice playing blues licks with different variations, such as changing the order, the rhythm, the pitch, or the tone.


Here are some practice routines and exercises that you can use to master blues licks:



  • Practice playing one blues lick over a 12-bar blues progression in different keys and positions.



  • Practice playing two or more blues licks back to back over a 12-bar blues progression in different keys and positions.



  • Practice playing one blues lick over different types of chords, such as major, minor, dominant, diminished, or augmented.



  • Practice playing one blues lick over different modes or tonalities, such as major, minor, Mixolydian, Dorian, or Lydian.



  • Practice playing one blues lick with different techniques, such as bends, slides, hammer-ons, pull-offs, vibratos, or harmonics.



  • Practice playing one blues lick with different dynamics, such as loud, soft, fast, slow, smooth, or staccato.



  • Practice improvising your own blues licks using the blues scale and the CAGED system.



How to play the blues your way?




The ultimate goal of learning the CAGED system and 100 licks for blues guitar is to play the blues your way. This means developing your own style and voice on the instrument. This means expressing yourself with your own ideas and emotions. This means having fun and enjoying the music.


The importance of developing your own style and voice




Developing your own style and voice is important because it makes you stand out from other guitar players. It makes you unique and original. It makes you authentic and genuine. It makes you memorable and recognizable.


To develop your own style and voice, you need to find your influences and inspirations. You need to listen to a lot of music and learn from a lot of guitar players. You need to find out what you like and what you don't like. You need to find out what works for you and what doesn't work for you.


You also need to experiment and explore. You need to try new things and take risks. You need to challenge yourself and push your boundaries. You need to make mistakes and learn from them.


How to improvise and create your own blues licks




Improvising and creating your own blues licks is the ultimate way of playing the blues your way. It is the most creative and expressive form of playing guitar. It is also the most fun and rewarding form of playing guitar.


To improvise and create your own blues licks, you need to use your ears and your imagination. You need to listen to the music and feel the groove. You need to imagine what you want to play and how you want to sound. You need to let go of your fears and doubts. You need to trust your instincts and intuition.


How to use the CAGED system and blues licks in different musical contexts




Using the CAGED system and blues licks in different musical contexts is the ultimate way of playing the blues your way. It is the most versatile and adaptable form of playing guitar. It is also the most enjoyable and satisfying form of playing guitar.


To use the CAGED system and blues licks in different musical contexts, you need to be aware and flexible. You need to be aware of the key, the tempo, the style, and the mood of the music. You need to be flexible enough to adjust your playing accordingly. You need to be able to switch between different keys, positions, modes, and tonalities. You need to be able to play with different techniques, dynamics, and expressions.


You also need to be respectful and supportive. You need to be respectful of the other musicians and their roles. You need to be supportive of the song and its structure. You need to be able to play with others and not over them. You need to be able to play in harmony and not in conflict.


Conclusion




The CAGED system and 100 licks for blues guitar are two powerful tools that can help you learn to play the blues your way. They can help you improve your skills, expand your vocabulary, and express yourself better on the instrument. They can also help you have more fun and enjoyment with your guitar playing.


If you want to learn more about the CAGED system and 100 licks for blues guitar, you can download a free PDF of 14 blues licks that you can use right away. You can also check out some of the best books, magazines, websites, videos, courses, and apps that can teach you how to play blues guitar.


But remember, the most important thing is to practice regularly and consistently. The more you practice, the more you will improve. The more you improve, the more you will enjoy. The more you enjoy, the more you will play.


So grab your guitar and start playing the blues your way!


FAQs




What is the difference between a lick and a riff?




A lick is a short musical phrase that is usually used as a solo or a fill. A riff is a repeated musical phrase that is usually used as a groove or a hook.


What are some of the best blues guitar players of all time?




Some of the best blues guitar players of all time are B.B. King, Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, Albert King, Freddie King, Buddy Guy, Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, and many others.


What are some of the best blues guitar songs of all time?




What are some of the best blues guitar songs of all time?




Some of the best blues guitar songs of all time are The Thrill Is Gone by B.B. King, Crossroads by Eric Clapton, Pride And Joy by Stevie Ray Vaughan, Voodoo Child (Slight Return) by Jimi Hendrix, Born Under A Bad Sign by Albert King, Hide Away by Freddie King, Damn Right I've Got The Blues by Buddy Guy, Sweet Home Chicago by Robert Johnson, Mannish Boy by Muddy Waters, Boom Boom by John Lee Hooker, and many others.


What are some of the best blues guitar albums of all time?




Some of the best blues guitar albums of all time are Live At The Regal by B.B. King, Unplugged by Eric Clapton, Texas Flood by Stevie Ray Vaughan, Are You Experienced by Jimi Hendrix, King Of The Blues Guitar by Albert King, Burglar by Freddie King, Stone Crazy! by Buddy Guy, King Of The Delta Blues Singers by Robert Johnson, Hard Again by Muddy Waters, The Healer by John Lee Hooker, and many others.


What are some of the best blues guitar techniques to learn?




Some of the best blues guitar techniques to learn are bends, slides, hammer-ons, pull-offs, vibratos, harmonics, double stops, trills, tremolos, palm muting, finger picking, hybrid picking, and slide guitar. 71b2f0854b


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